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126 notices – page 1 de 13.

Alberta facts on wood series fact sheets for Balsam fir, Balsam poplar, Black spruce, Jack pine, Lodgepole pine, Tamarack, Trembling aspen, White birch, and White spruce

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub5602
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Édition
37756
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Collaborateur
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Édition
37756
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Description physique
36 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Market Analysis
Sujet
Alberta
Fir
Larix
Picea
Pinus
Populus
Value added
Série
Facts on wood series
W-2189B
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
Each fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for the species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Populus balsamifera
Picea mariana
Pinus banksiana
Pinus contorta Dougl. var. latifolia
Larix laricina
Populus tremuloides
Betula papyrifera
Picea glauca
Documents
Moins de détails

Application de la colorimétrie aux produits en bois d'apparence

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub2410
Auteur
Rancourt, V.
Date
February 2006
Édition
38982
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Rancourt, V.
Date
February 2006
Édition
38982
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Description physique
4 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Advanced Wood Materials
Série
E-4153
Localisation
Québec, Québec
Langue
French
Résumé
La couleur est un facteur crucial lors de la fabrication de produits en bois franc d'apparence, aussi, l'uniformité de la couleur d'un produit a un impact direct sur sa valeur finale. La majorité des fabricants de composants de bois régissent le classement de la couleur selon une interprétation subjective. Des échantillons servent de référence mais le classement est influencé par les paramètres invironnants et la perception individuelle de l'observateur.
Colour of wood
Documents
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Application of colorimetry for wood appearance products

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub2409
Auteur
Rancourt, V.
Date
February 2006
Édition
38981
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Rancourt, V.
Date
February 2006
Édition
38981
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Description physique
4 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Advanced Wood Materials
Série
Technology Profile ; TP-05-01E
E-4152
Localisation
Québec, Québec
Langue
English
Résumé
Colour is a crucial factor in manufacturing hardwood appearance products, and uniformity of colour has a direct impact on the final value of a product. Most wood component manufacturers classify colour using a subjective scale. Although reference samples are used, subjective classification is influenced by both environmental factors and individual perceptions.
Colour of wood
Documents
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Application of fire models in building construction, 2006

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub2367
Auteur
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Date
March 2006
Édition
38930
Genre du document
Research report
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Mehaffey, J.R. (Jim)
Collaborateur
Canada. Canadian Forest Service
Date
March 2006
Édition
38930
Genre du document
Research report
Description physique
22 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Building Systems
Sujet
Resistance
Série
Canadian Forest Service No. 8
3637
Localisation
Québec, Québec
Langue
English
Résumé
This final report summarises progress in this multi-year project in which fire models have been applied to address a number of market access issues of interest to the Canadian wood industry. Promoting wood-frame construction in Asian countries has been hindered by the fact that fire-resistance ratings assigned to wood-frame assemblies in Canada are lower than those assigned to similar assemblies in many other countries. Computer models developed at Forintek have been used to assess fire-resistance ratings of wood-frame walls subjected to test methods employed in a number of Asian countries. It was found that differences in fire-resistance ratings quoted in different countries are due to the different loads applied during the tests. Given the same exposures and loads, Canadian assemblies perform as well those from any other country. A methodology for delivering performance-based design for fire-resistance of wood-frame buildings was developed. The methodology entails modelling the anticipated fire severity and using computer models to predict the performance of wood-frame assemblies protected by gypsum board. The methodology has been applied to two wood-frame buildings: a three-storey hotel and a three-storey office building. Fire models have been used to assess the performance of wood products in a variety of practical applications in domestic and international markets.
Fire models have been shown to simulate the results of fire experiments conducted in wood-frame houses in Kemano thereby supporting the use of modelling in performance-based fire-safety design.
Forintek provided third-party review for the performance-based design of the expansion to the Vancouver Convention Centre. Modelling demonstrated that suspended glulam ceilings can be safely employed in a ballroom and pre-function areas despite non-compliance with building codes.
A fire protection firm is assessing the viability of utilizing wood trusses to create a pitched roof assembly on existing concrete buildings in Beijing. Performance-based design techniques employing fire models are being employed in the work. Forintek is providing advice to the fire protection firm. Efforts have also been made to promote performance-based design at home and in Canada’s export markets as a strategy to eliminate the inequitable treatment afforded wood products by prescriptive codes.
Forintek scientists made presentations during an APEC Seminar convened to inform regulators of approaches to managing fire risks so as not to impede the use of wood products unnecessarily.
Forintek scientists have co-authored a chapter in the 4th Edition of the SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection Engineering which will be published in 2006. Participation in writing such documents is part of the Fire Group’s strategy to foster acceptance of performance-based design for fire safety.
Forintek scientists are participating in ISO deliberations addressing the performance of structures in fires. The methodology developed in this project is to be considered for inclusion in design guides. Efforts are well advanced to develop improved fire models for predicting the thermal and structural response of wood-frame assemblies. These improved models are required for performance-based design in which fires typically grow quickly and after burning at a steady rate for a period of time undergo a decay phase.
Fire resistance
Models
Documents
Moins de détails

Balsam fir : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub5593
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Édition
37747
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Collaborateur
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Édition
37747
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Description physique
4 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Market Analysis
Sujet
Alberta
Fir
Value added
Série
Facts on wood series
W-2189C
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Abies balsamea
Documents
Moins de détails

Balsam poplar : Alberta facts on wood series

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub5594
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Date
March 2006
Édition
37748
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Lindenbach-Gibson, R.
Fell, David
Marinescu, Marian
Rice, J.
Collaborateur
Alberta Forestry Research Institute
Date
March 2006
Édition
37748
Genre du document
Pamphlet
Description physique
4 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Market Analysis
Sujet
Alberta
Populus
Value added
Série
Facts on wood series
W-2189D
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
Next to trembling aspen, balsam poplar is the most prominent deciduous species in Alberta’s boreal mixed forest. It is commonly found in the prairie forest transition zones throughout the south-central regions of the Boreal forest. While the species is common, it is rarely abundant. Situated mainly in mixed stands on rich soils, common associates to balsam poplar include: white spruce, aspen, paper birch and tamarack. Within Alberta, the species is widespread through Aspen Grove, Mixedwood and Lower Foothills sections of the province’s Boreal Forest Region. Apart from forested land, balsam poplar is also found on abandoned farmland, burned over areas and riverbanks. Trees are medium-sized, 18 to 24 metres tall and 30 to 60 cm in diameter. Balsam poplar comprises 15.1% of Alberta’s hardwood inventory; about 6% of Alberta’s total forest inventory. Balsam fir is a native tree species to approximately two-thirds of the eastern Boreal forest across Canada. It is quite common in Alberta throughout the Slave Lake area and along the foothills (northern central regions of the province). Balsam fir can be found across a broad range of site conditions, preferring more shaded and competitive conditions. The species is rarely found in pure stands and is typically shorter-lived than the spruces. Balsam fir is a small-to medium-sized tree, 12 to 18 metres tall and 30 to 45 cm in diameter. On a national level, balsam fir accounts for nearly 12% of the total Canadian forest inventory. Its greatest proportion of total growing stock is located in southeastern Canada, especially in the Maritime Provinces, where it is considered a valuable commercial species. In Alberta, balsam fir accounts for a small percentage of the province’s softwood inventory – approximately 3%. The fact sheet describes visual, physical and working properties for this species for the wood-consuming value added sector.
Alberta woods
Value added - Alberta
Populus balsamifera
Documents
Moins de détails

Benefits of including surface defect information in edger and trimmer optimization

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub1292
Auteur
Orbay, L.
Date
March 2006
Édition
37768
Genre du document
Research report
Domaine
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Auteur
Orbay, L.
Date
March 2006
Édition
37768
Genre du document
Research report
Description physique
23 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Champ de recherche
Digitalization
Sujet
Value added
Trimming
Surface properties
Recovery
Quality control
Qualitative analysis
Optimization
Série
W-2223
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
The objective of this project was to quantify the lumber value recovery up-lift that is achievable by adding surface defect detection to board profile scanning in sawmill edger optimization. Optimized profile edging solutions of 194 spruce-pine-fir sample boards were compared to optimized edging solutions that took into account surface defects as well as the geometric shape of the board. The edger optimization improvement was found to be marginal. Data analysis showed a benefit of only $0.13 per m3 of processed logs, an equivalent of $237.11 per shift. The findings of this report are mill specific. The value recovery figures were collected in a mill with given log supply, machinery and market orientation. A more significant up-lift in value recovery would likely be obtained for higher valued products produced from larger logs typically processed in coastal sawmills.
Edging Optimization
Trimming Optimization
Surface quality
Value recovery
Documents
Moins de détails

A bioenergy strategy for British Columbia

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub3049
Collaborateur
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests and Range
British Columbia. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources
BC Hydro
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
November 2006
Édition
39695
Genre du document
Research report
Domaine
Bioproducts
Collaborateur
British Columbia. Ministry of Forests and Range
British Columbia. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources
BC Hydro
Forintek Canada Corp.
Date
November 2006
Édition
39695
Genre du document
Research report
Description physique
1 v.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Bioproducts
Champ de recherche
Building Systems
Sujet
Utilization
Renewable natural resources
Biomass
Série
W-2980
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
Biomass
Renewable natural resources
Utilization
Documents
Moins de détails

Biological method to pre-dry lumber with wetwood

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub38957
Auteur
Yang, D.-Q.
Date
March 2006
Genre du document
Research report
Domaine
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Auteur
Yang, D.-Q.
Date
March 2006
Genre du document
Research report
Description physique
67 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Wood Manufacturing & Digitalization
Champ de recherche
Advanced Wood Manufacturing
Sujet
Yeasts
Wetwoods
Seasoning
Bacteria
Série
General Revenue Project No. 4030
4030
Localisation
Québec, Québec
Langue
English
Résumé
Wetwood, or water pocket, has higher moisture content and lower permeability than normal wood, which cause problems for lumber drying. The high moisture content of wetwood usually requires relatively long periods for adequate drying; consequently, it causes a high risk for developing checks, splits, crook, bow and twist of lumber in kiln drying. These problems have not been solved by any physical, chemical or mechanical methods yet. Using biological method to pre-dry lumber containing wetwood is a new concept introduced in this project. Wetwood is formed by bacteria growth inside normal wood. Some fungi are able to kill bacteria and to utilize foetid liquid produced by these micro-organisms. Consequently, the permeability of wetwood can be increased and the lumber drying rate can be improved. The present project intends a research on biological method to pre-dry lumber containing wetwood, and to evaluate efficacy and economic benefit of such a biological treatment. Trees of balsam fir, sub-alpine fir and aspen were felled and cut into lumber. Isolation of causal agents was conducted from wet pockets of these wood species by using peptone agar and malt extract agar media. A total of 319 cultures were obtained from the wetwood of these three wood species. Three bacteria and two yeasts were isolated from balsam fir wetwood, 2 bacteria and 1 yeast were more frequently isolated from aspen wetwood, and 2 bacteria and 5 yeasts were obtained from sub-alpine fir. Two bacteria were isolated from the wetwood of all 3 wood species: Shigella sonnei and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Other bacteria and yeasts isolated were identified as Aerococcus viridans, Chryseomonas luteol, Candida boidinli, C. zeylanoides, Cryptococcus albidus, C. laurentii, C. terreus, and Rhodotorula mucileginosa. In addition to these identified bacteria and yeasts, two other yeasts isolated from balsam fir and sub-alpine fir wetwood were unabile to be identified. Six bacteria and yeast isolates were re-inoculated on normal wood of balsam fir; they were A-a (a bacterium isolated from aspen and identified as Shigella sonnei), A-c (a yeast isolated from aspen and identified as Cryptococcus laurentii), B-a (a bacterium isolated from balsam fir and identified as Shigella sonnei), B-c (a mixture of 2 bacteria isolated from balsam fir and identified as Shigella sonnei and Aerococcus viridans), Y-2 (an unidentified yeast isolated from balsam fir), and SaB-2 (a bacterium isolated from sub-alpine fir and identified as Shigella sonnei). The result showed that all of these micro-organisms caused wetwood formation on inoculated normal wood samples in 2 weeks. This result indicates that wetwood formation in trees is not caused by only 1 micro-organism but is more likely caused by several species (either bacteria or yeasts) that can colonise well in the wood of trees. The moisture contents (MC) of the inoculated wood blocks increased from 41.2% to 220-240 %, whereas the MCs of the control samples submerged in a liquid culture medium without inoculation reached only 110%. When control samples were dried to a MC of 13%, the inoculated wood samples still had MCs between 80% and 105%. This result indicates that drying lumber containing wetwood will take double the time required to dry normal lumber without wetwood. An antagonist test using fungal candidates was conducted on agar plates. In this test, 6 potential fungal antagonists and 6 wetwood causal agents (WCA) were used. The six fungal antagonists were Gliocladium roseum (a bioprotectant developed by Forintek), a white isolate of Ophiostoma piliferum (a fungus used in a commercial bioprotectant, Cartapip), a white isolate of Ceratocystis resinifera (an anti-sapstain biological agent used by Chantal Morin at Laval University), Geotrichum sp.A (a white fungus in Deuteromycetes isolated from Jack pine logs, DP3/5B-3a, 1998), Geotrichum sp. B (a white fungus in Deuteromycetes isolated from balsam fir logs, DF3/1B-1b, 1998), and Phaeotheca dimorphospora (a biological control agent of tree disease from Laval University). The six wetwood causal agents were A-a (a bacterium isolated from wetwood of aspen), A-c (a yeast isolated from wetwood of aspen), B-a (a bacterium isolated from wetwood of balsam fir), Y-2 (a yeast isolated from wetwood of balsam fir), SaB-2 (a bacterium isolated from wetwood of sub-alpine fir), and SaY-4 (a mixture of a yeast and a bacterium isolated from wetwood of sub-alpine fir). The results showed that Geotrichum sp.A and Geotrichum sp.B were the most effective against all 6 WCA inoculated; they reduced growth of the WCA in 7 days and completely absorbed colonies of WCA in 11 days. G. roseum, O. piliferum, and C. resinifera were moderately effective against 5 WCAs, but not effective on bacterium A-a that was isolated from aspen wetwood. P. dimorphospora was the least effective against any of these WCA. The three promising fungal antagonists, Geotrichum sp., G. roseum and the white isolate of O. piliferum, selected from agar plate test were used for an antagonist test on balsam fir wetwood blocks in the laboratory conditions. This test was conducted on small wetwood samples (2 x 4 x 1 inch) in incubators at 25°C and two relative humidity ranges (100% and 75% RH). The results showed that all these three fungi were able to establish on wood surfaces and able to reduce wetwood contents. At 25°C and 75% RH, Geotrichum sp. was the most effective to reduce wetwood content in samples, followed by G. roseum, and then by O. piliferum. G. roseum and Geotrichum sp. not only reduce wetwood content, but also inhibit mold growth and wood stain, compared with untreated control samples. At 25°C and 100% RH, the moisture contents of treated and untreated samples were not changed in any week of the testing period. This result indicates that biological pre-dry wetwood samples should not be conducted at this high relative humidity condition. A test was conducted to investigate the inhibitory ability of Geotrichum sp., the wetwood control candidate, against sapstaining fungi on wood. The results showed that if balsam fir wood wafers were inoculated with Geotrichum sp. 3 days before the staining fungi, no staining fungi grew on these samples. If wood wafers were inoculated with Geotrichum sp. and staining fungi at the same time, samples were covered by both Geotrichum sp. and the staining fungus Ophiostoma piceae in a ratio of 1:1. If wood wafers were inoculated with the staining fungi 3 days before Geotrichum sp., samples were absolutely covered by the staining fungus and fully stained. A study on environmental effects on the growth of Geotrichum sp., the wetwood control agent, showed that this fungus started growth at 5°C, had optimal growth between 20-25°C, stopped growth at 30°C, and died at 40°C. Geotrichum sp. had a wide range of pH requirement and grew well in agar medium at pHs between 3 and 10. Geotrichum sp. started to grow at 29% MC, and the speed of the growth increased along with the increase of MC in wood. The best fungal growth of Geotrichum sp. was observed on wood blocks containing 56% MC. Geotrichum sp. was able to grow on wood of jack pine, black spruce, balsam fir, sub-alpine fir and aspen, but it grew better on wood of jack pine, balsam fir and black spruce than on sub-alpine fir and aspen. Geotrichum sp. was able to grow together with an anti-sapstain fungus, Gliocladium roseum, without any antibiotic or incompatible growth reaction. In the laboratory conditions, the biological treated boards reduced wood MC by 22-37% more than untreated boards. Untreated boards were fully covered by molds and stain after 8 weeks in storage, and 0% of boards was acceptable for use. The biological treated boards were less affected, with 35-75% of pieces acceptable. The time required for drying biological treated boards was estimated reducing by 10.5 hours compared with untreated controls. After drying, the biological treated boards reduced the rate of crook, bow and twist by 5-20%, but increased the rate of split and check by 5-12%, compared with untreated controls. The total deformation rate was reduced up to 5% by the best biological treatment. In the field conditions, untreated boards were 100% affected by molds and stain after 8 weeks in storage, whereas the best biological treated boards were only affected by 6%. Drying biological treated and untreated boards took similar times, but it was estimated reducing drying time by 48 hours compared with fresh boards. Compared with untreated controls, the biological treated boards reduced the rate of crook, bow and twist by 2-13%, and reduced the rate of split and check by 3-30%. The total deformation rate was reduced by 5-22%, depending on the treatments. CT scanner was able to detect wetwood locations inside a piece of lumber, and the wetwood present in either heartwood, sapwood or both wood tissues. After the bio-treatment, the wetwood contents of boards were significantly reduced.
Wetwood
Seasoning - Predrying
Yeasts
Bacteria
Biological Control
Fungi
Documents
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Biology and management of bluestain fungi

https://library.fpinnovations.ca/fr/permalink/fpipub4551
Auteur
Uzunovic, Adnan
Date
March 2006
Édition
41344
Genre du document
Research report
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Auteur
Uzunovic, Adnan
Collaborateur
Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
Date
March 2006
Édition
41344
Genre du document
Research report
Description physique
4 p.
Secteur
Wood Products
Domaine
Sustainable Construction
Champ de recherche
Advanced Wood Materials
Sujet
Wood
Stain fungal
Stain
Série
Canadian Forest Service No. 38;4781
W-2282
Localisation
Vancouver, British Columbia
Langue
English
Résumé
This report describes research to determine the major source of bluestain fungi and determine the mechanisms of their dispersion, as well as the biology and weak points of pests that may be exploited to control them.
Stain - Fungal - Control
Fungi - Wood staining
Documents
Moins de détails

126 notices – page 1 of 13.